COE Mobile Learning Discussion

We discussed the difference between mLearning and eLearning using some of the resources below which identify differences in timing, information access, context, and assessment. mLearning is defined in the article as “the use of mobile technology to aid in the learning, reference or exploration of information useful to an individual at that moment or in a specific use context.”  So is it mobile learning if your device doesn’t leave the classroom/desk?

We discussed whether classrooms are ready for tablets as a replacement for computers and textbooks to fit student lifestyles and expectations. We think they are just about there! What do you think?

Ways the university could support mobile learning:

Blackboard Mobile Learn app IS supported: http://www.blackboard.com/resources/mobile/mobile_learn_splash/desktop/portal-nonsprint.html#android

Web Conferencing on a device will hopefully be available within the next year when we change from elive to another web conferencing solution. Video conferencing on a device will also probably be supported soon. A Polycom app is currently available just not supported by the university yet.

Also we are hoping for support for wireless mirorring of a device via projector in the classroom.

Resources we explored:

mLearning is not eLearning on a mobile device: http://floatlearning.com/2010/04/mlearning-is-not-elearning-on-a-mobile-device/

6 Reasons Tablets are Ready for the Classroom: http://mashable.com/2011/05/16/tablets-education/

ASTE Beyond Portability The Shift Toward Mobile Learning: https://sites.google.com/site/disruptingtheinstitution/beyond-portability-the-shift-toward-mobile-learnin

Khan Academy: http://www.khanacademy.org/

 

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COE Mobile Learning Discussion

We discussed the difference between mLearning and eLearning using some of the resources below which identify differences in timing, information access, context, and assessment. mLearning is defined in the article as “the use of mobile technology to aid in the learning, reference or exploration of information useful to an individual at that moment or in a specific use context.”  So is it mobile learning if your device doesn’t leave the classroom/desk?<

We discussed whether classrooms are ready for tablets as a replacement for computers and textbooks to fit student lifestyles and expectations. We think they are just about there! What do you think?

What are some ways the university could support mobile learning:

Blackboard Mobile Learn app IS supported: http://www.blackboard.com/resources/mobile/mobile_learn_splash/desktop/portal-nonsprint.html#android

Web Conferencing on a device will hopefully be available within the next year when we change from elive to another web conferencing solution. Video conferencing on a device will also probably be supported soon. A Polycom app is currently available just not supported by the university yet.

Also we are hoping for support for wireless mirorring of a device via projector in the classroom.

Resources we explored:

mLearning is not eLearning on a mobile device: http://floatlearning.com/2010/04/mlearning-is-not-elearning-on-a-mobile-device/

6 Reasons Tablets are Ready for the Classroom: http://mashable.com/2011/05/16/tablets-education/

ASTE Beyond Portability The Shift Toward Mobile Learning: https://sites.google.com/site/disruptingtheinstitution/beyond-portability-the-shift-toward-mobile-learnin

Khan Academy: http://www.khanacademy.org/

 

Is Your Distance Education Course Actually a Correspondence Course?

“Without the proper technologies used or appropriate interaction, courses could be declared as correspondence courses…with financial aid implications.”

http://wcetblog.wordpress.com/2012/04/20/correspondence-definition/

Russ Poulin, Deputy Director, Research & Analysis
WCET – WICHE Cooperative for Educational Technologies

Current Correspondence and Distance Education Definitions

Correspondence course: (1) A course provided by an institution under which the institution provides instructional materials, by mail or electronic transmission, including examinations on the materials, to students who are separated from the instructor. Interaction between the instructor and student is limited, is not regular and substantive, and is primarily initiated by the student. Correspondence courses are typically self-paced.

(2) If a course is part correspondence and part residential training, the Secretary considers the course to be a correspondence course.

(3) A correspondence course is not distance education.

Distance education means education that uses one or more of the technologies listed in paragraphs (1) through (4) of this definition to deliver instruction to students who are separated from the instructor and to support regular and substantive interaction between the students and the instructor, either synchronously or asynchronously. The technologies may include—

(1) The internet;

(2) One-way and two-way transmissions through open broadcast, closed circuit, cable, microwave, broadband lines, fiber optics, satellite, or wireless communications devices;

(3) Audio conferencing; or

(4) Video cassettes, DVDs, and CD–ROMs, if the cassettes, DVDs, or CD–ROMs are used in a course in conjunction with any of the technologies listed in paragraphs (1) through (3) of this definition.

Observing Distance Student Interns

We had a great discussion this morning about the challenges of observing distance student interns. We discussed the typical problem of viewing video of a classroom when you can’t see or hear everything that is happening. No matter whether you are using Skype or some other tool, it is the camera and microphone that make the difference (but the equipiment keeps getting better and better). We talked about the advantages and disadvantages of live versus recorded video. Live might be easier from a legal standpoint, but recorded has the advantage of being able to go back and look at specific points with the intern and classmates (and also may be necessary as our students come from farther and farther away!).

We like the idea of having the COE create some kind of packet of information for faculty who will be observing students at a distance. This would ensure consistency and provide support. It could include legal and ethical guidelines and forms or releases for students.

Here are some tools we can consider, but we hate to put more costs on the students!

thereNow
thereNow’s observation and feedback platform is a secure, web-based application that facilitates effective teacher coaching and mentoring, self-reflection, and education research.

http://www.therenow.net/software/onlineObservation.php

Evirx
web-based analysis of video to engage preservice and inservice teachers

https://evirx.com/education

eCove (this one is more about data collection)
Observations that save time, increase accuracy, and provide the basis for testing implementation of researched best practices and student behavior interventions.

http://www.ecove.net/home/cov/index.html

Here is the link to the UVA’s My Teaching Partner program:
http://curry.virginia.edu/research/centers/castl/mtp

Resources for Presentations

Here are some resources for presentations. These are not geared toward education but very useful anyway.

Presentation Zen by Garr Reynolds along with his great website at http://www.garrreynolds.com/

Non-Designer’s Presentation Book by Robin Williams (not the actor)

While I hate to say how many slides or words per slide you should have, Guy Kawasaki has a unique perspective due to a medical condition: http://blog.guykawasaki.com/2005/12/the_102030_rule.html#axzz1mTkHNJHz

Beyond PowerPoint http://blogs.nitle.org/2010/10/04/beyond-powerpoint-emerging-technologies/

And remember, “Don’t put your talk on your slides, and you won’t have to read them!” Robin Williams

Effective Presentations

How do I avoid PowerPoint poisoning?

We had a great roundtable conversation about what makes an effective presentation, mostly in teaching. We discussed challenges like how to make effective slides (use high quality pictures and a small amount of text that prompts and/or provokes the audience) and when to use PowerPoint versus other tools, like Prezi. One effective way to use PowerPoint we discussed is using a self-running slideshow with pictures and music as people are entering the room.

How do I spark participation?

To keep students on their toes, we discussed different ways to be sure they are prepared to answer or ask questions. We also discussed the importance involving students in learning by using  interactive whiteboards (eLive) and having students create the “slides” themselves (either together in class or submitted beforehand).

What are the best practices?

Ask your students! We talked about the importance of getting student feedback using surveys or journaling…and then, of course, making changes based on the feedback.

Here is the recording of our roundtable discussion.

Downloading Grades from Blackboard to Excel

The steps to download grades to Excel are different in Blackboard 9.1. I try to download grades once during the semester and once at the end, just to have a backup copy offline. Here’s how:

  1. Log into your Blackboard course and be sure Edit Mode is ON.
  2. Click on the Grade Center area of the Control Panel and then select Full Grade Center.
  3. On the Grade Center page, click on the Work Offline button and select Download.
  4. On the Download Grades page under Data, select Full Grade Center.
  5. On the Download Grades page under Options, select Tab as the Delimiter Type.
  6. Click Submit. A file containing the Grade Center data will be created.
  7. Click on the DOWNLOAD button and choose where to save the file.